Overalls and Boots Transcribed
Pinellas County Agricultural News




















































Frank Fields, out at Bayview, certainly wins the prize for growing of large cabbages. Last Thursday afternoon, Mr. Fields presented the News with a sample specimen of these cabbages, and this particular one weighed thirteen and one-quarter pounds, being enough for four meals. This cabbage was not only large, but sound and very sweet. Source: Clearwater News: 3-11-1914











































Hon. J. W. Williamson is preparing the ground to plant four or five acres more strawberries this year. That makes about twelve acres for him in one field. Source: St. Petersburg Times: 7-20-1901













































Mrs. Vincent Ridgely has a Surinam cherry tree in full fruitage for the second time in one season. The fruit is quite large and as sweet as sugar. Two full crops in one year is something remarkable, even in this country of surprises. Source: Evening Independent: 10-26-1908








































Sells Last Grove

Judge J. D. Bell who has been a citrus grower in this section for many years, sold the last of his orange groves this week, when he disposed of fifteen acres on Ninth street north to Messrs. H. W. Laurence and W. E. Mills of Minnesota.

The Judge has devoted nearly all of his spare time for several years to his law business and with the disposal of his last piece of grove land he will retire from active duty among citrus growers. Source: St. Petersburg Times: 5-5-1911








































One of the finest displays of papayas in the upper Pinellas area is being viewed daily by throngs of victory gardeners at the home of E. S. Baldwin, 636 Park street. The stalks are in full bearing, some of the clusters containing papayas weighing from five to seven pounds each. Baldwin, incidentally, has one of the best victory gardens in Clearwater, despite the loss of one hand. Source: Evening Independent: 4-20-43











































A Rare Fruit

F. G. Sawrie this week left at the Times office a specimen of a very rare fruit indeed-the tomot, a thoroughly tropical fruit and one seldom raised in the United States. The Sawrie brothers have a tomot tree on their beautiful place south of town which years ago came from the government experimental station of Washington. This is its first production, having been killed down in 1895. It is a small deep yellow fruit and is decidedly a curiosity. Source: St. Petersburg Times: 11-2-1901

 






































R. E. Ludwig’s Ludouico grove has ten acres of Tardiff and pineapple oranges and grapefruit, also a fine pinery under shade cover, which produces the finest of pineapples during all seasons. Source: Evening Independent: 8-25-1908











































An Eden…The Tampa Peninsular of the 10th says; We had a call this week from J. R. Wise, Esq., of Clearwater, in this county, who tells us that he is luxuriating in green corn and other kindred eatables, produced by him in the open field, which has not had the injury of frost. Who can say that Hillsborough county is not an “Eden.” Source: Weekly Floridian: 2-20-1872









































Sold Valuable Orange Grove

S. S. Coachman Buys Old McMullen Grove at a Large Figure

The old McMullen orange grove, on the west coast, formerly owned by Capt. J. P. McMullen, has been sold by his heirs to S. S. Coachman.
The price paid was $8,100. The grove is one of the most valuable and productive in the county. Source: Tampa Tribune: 4-3-1902









































I. F. Moore is the champion potato grower of St. Petersburg, so far as the Rambler can judge and has had unusual luck on a city lot. His son bought two lots at First avenue and Twenty-fifth street north and after the swamp land had been drained Mr. Moore decided to see what could be grown on the land. It was fine muck and looked rich. Last year however, it was too sour to grow anything but this year all kinds of vegetables have been grown. Mr. Moore brought the Rambler some Irish potatoes that were fine. He planted only a half a bushel of seed potatoes and will gather in as the one year’s crop, many times that amount. He says the potatoes are so thick in the fields that it is really a pleasure to gather them. He has had fine luck with everything but corn and wants to know how W. L. Godman grew sugar cane without the worms eating it. Source: Evening Independent: 4-3-1913











































Pinellas Cotton

Imagine Pinellas County growing cotton! Ham Baskin erstwhile mayor of Clearwater and operator of WFLA, produced this summer, six bales of sea island cotton near Clearwater. Perhaps not one in a hundred in St. Petersburg ever saw cotton grow in Pinellas. But time was when Pinellas farm economy was on the hog and hominy and cotton tempo. Then along came King Orange and dethroned King Cotton for a reason that a few pleasant weeks’ work in winter in the shade of orange trees sufficed to make a living instead of back breaking work in the summer. Those were the golden days. But now citrus is the big business and for the last decade bad business and perhaps Baskin signals the beginning of a new cycle. Source: St. Petersburg Times: 10-4-40










































The McLean crop of oranges has been moved through the Ozona Orange Packing Co.’s, packing house. This is one of the largest groves in this vicinity. The packing house force is now engaged on the Grenelle and Eavey crops. Source: Tampa Tribune: 12-8-1904












































Dairyman Moving Plant To Pasco

Clearwater, May 6…J. P. Phelps, who has for years conducted the ideal dairy near the eastern city limits, is preparing to move to Pasco county, near San Antonio. Most of the dairy stock has already been taken to the adjoining county, where Mr. Phelps has purchased a farm among the rolling hills and perfected arrangements to sell his dairy products at wholesale. The fact that land in Clearwater is becoming too valuable for grazing purposes led this veteran dairyman to seek green fields and pastures now. Source: Evening Independent: 5-6-24









































Melons Are Shipped To Northern Marts

Anona, June 7…H. D. Ulmer, Anona, and William McNair, have undertaken a watermelon project on a large scale, on some of Mr. Ulmer’s property here. Weekly shipments of melons are being made to northern markets.

Hugh Coil, principal of the Anona grammer school, realized more than $25 from the sale of peaches this past month, which was undertaken as an experiment, in connection with his other home garden activities.

Because of the lack of rain during recent weeks local gardners and citrus growers have been doing artificial watering. Source: Evening Independent: 6-7-1937








































T. N. Hariman returned last night from Clearwater, where he has been engaged curing the tobacco crops of Messrs. Drew, Johnson and Seaport. He reports the quality of the crop in that section as being excellent with every prospect of a largely increased acreage the coming spring. Source: Morning Tribune: 12-16-1897








































McIntosh…Besides the usual amount of vegetables being shipped, a carload of cattle was shipped to Tarpon Springs from here last week , also a carload of hogs to Hastings, while on Wednesday a carload of sheep was shipped to Tarpon Springs. Mr. Nick Sakistro has been in town several days looking for more cattle. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 5-8-1914

 






































Clearwater… Fruit is on the move. Johnville Booth is shipping his grapefruit and it is fine. Mr. Booth says it is time to ship when there is a demand. Source: St. Petersburg Times: 11-2-1901






































Ozona, Nov. 12—Interest in the orange industry is growing steadily. Mr. Snell, general manager of the Ozona Orange Packing Co.’s is quite ubiquitous, picking up crops to be put out through the packing house. Source: Tampa Tribune: 11-13-1904









































Bought A Farm

Judge L. B. Cooper has purchased of Mrs. H. Barnett her 10 acre farm near Disston City and declares his intention of moving out there and spending the summer working his orange trees. Everyone will congratulate the Judge on his acquisition, but will hope that he will not permit his propensity for hard work to retire him to the country permanently. Source: St. Petersburg Times: 5-4-1901







































More Trees

Manager F. E. Cole has received and is having set 300 more citrus trees, oranges tangerines and grapefruit on the Wood & Cole syndicate lands on south Ninth street, which is being made a magnificent property. Source: St. Petersburg Times: 6-29-1901











































C. B. McClung

Has accepted the agency for this peninsula for the Wilson & Toomer Fertilizer Co. of Jacksonville. Mr. McClung is a successful grower and a good canvasser and representing as he does an excellent house he is doing a fine business. Last week he sold 150 tons of his goods. Source: St. Petersburg Times: 11-9-1901









































A Fine Grove

A Times man spent a pleasant hour one day this week visiting with a friend the well known Neeld grove south of the city, now the property of George Blackstone of New Haven Conn. It is one of the best known places on the peninsula, consisting of 7 acres planted to the finest varieties of oranges, with a liberal sprinkling of numerous other citrus and tropical fruits. Mr. Blackstone has also bought 10 acres of land adjoining and judging from work in progress it is to be made a magnificent place. J. W. Rogers, proprietor of the Rogers House in this city and a veteran orange grower has charge of the grove and under his trained management it is putting on a splendid appearance. Although $7800 is some for 7 acres of land, Mr. Blackstone is to be congratulated on his purchase and on having such a manager as Mr. Rogers. Source: St. Petersburg Times: 9-29-1901





































Dairyman Moving Plant To Pasco

Clearwater, May 6…J. P. Phelps, who has for years conducting the ideal dairy near the eastern city limits, is preparing to move to Pasco County, near San Antonio. Most of the dairy stock has already been taken to the adjoining county, where Mr. Phelps has purchased a farm among the rolling hills and perfected arrangements to sell his dairy products at wholesale. The fact that land in Clearwater is becoming too valuable for grazing purposes led this veteran dairyman to seek green fields and pastures now. Source: Evening Independent: 5-6-1924










































McIntosh…Besides the usual amount of vegetables being shipped, a carload of cattle was shipped to Tarpon Springs from here last week, also a carload of hogs to Hastings, while on Wednesday a carload of sheep was shipped to Tarpon Springs. Mr. Nick Sakistro has been in town several days looking for more cattle. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 5-8-1914








































Shipping To Cuba

J. D. Bell shipped a consignment of Pineapple plants Saturday to party from London, Canada, who is establishing a pinery in Cuba. Judge Bell has established a wide reputation for his plants and fruit and has enjoyed a ready and profitable market for them. Source: St. Petersburg Times: 5-4-1901









































Raised Figures

C. B. McClung calls at The Times office to make a confession that he has been guilty of a glaring misrepresentation, unintentional though it was, Last week he put the orange shipments from Dunedin at 30,000 boxes—whereas the fact is it has already reached 34,000 and will certainly go to 40,000. Source St. Petersburg Times: 12-7-1901








































Some Fancy Fruit

At C. W. Springstead’s packing house one day this week a Times man was shown a lot of about the fanciest citrus fruit he had ever seen. They were a load of grape fruit from Mr. Springstead’s grove north of the city. They were very large, uniform, thin skinned and solid, smooth of surface and glitteringly bright in color—truly a magnificent fruit. They are also a glittering success from a financial point of view. Source: St. Petersburg Times: 12-7-1901









































T. W. Graham has a 13-acre grove here, but owing to dry weather this year’s crop will be very short. Three years ago this grove produced 2, 500 boxes of oranges and grapefruit, while this year 10 percent of above figure would be a high estimate of its yield. I merely mention this to show how weather conditions change crop production. This same grove may produce 3,000 boxes next year and redeem its old reputation. Source: Evening Independent: 8-25-1908





































Mr. M. W. Ulmer, of Largo, was numbered among the prominent visitors here Monday. He is one of the largest and most successful turpentine operators in Florida. He is well known in Ocala, having for a long time conducted large operations at Conant, near Lake Weir. Mr. Ulmer is charmed with Largo and that whole section of Florida. His home is about two miles from the gulf and five miles from the bay and since his residence there he has never used either screens or mosquito bars. Living there is delightful and “life,” in the language of Mr. Cleveland, “is a sweet song.” The orange groves are a vision of beauty and promise an enormous yield. Guavas, mangoes and other tropical fruits are in abundance. Like the orange tree, the pine also yields well. The average yield of spirits is about fifty barrels per crop and the resin averages about the same. Mr. Ulmer is very much in love with his new home. Source: Ocala Banner: 6-3-1906







































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