Chitlins Transcribed #2















































W. E. Mackay of Summerfield was in town today as was Marion L. Payne of Fairfield, while J. J. Brinson is serving as a juror. Mr. Brinson says he has 300 stands of bees and later on honey would flow like water around his premises and Ocala would get the overflow. 
Source: Ocala Evening Star: 5-2-1905











































Capt., J. B. Martin killed over 100 fine hogs and has the meat all cured. He will not have to buy any bacon this year for his turpentine farm. He will also turn his attention to farming and will plant 60 acres in corn besides other farm products. We wish him much success.

Source: Ocala Evening Star: 2-19-1909












































We have in our office a sugar cane, with branch stalks, each having eight matured joints of more than ordinary length. It was grown on the plantation of Mr. Jesse Willis of this (Marion) county. The soil of Marion is so fertile that one stalk cannot appropriate more than half the nourishment its root affords so it has to branch. It can be seen at our office. Put this in your pipe Mr. Era. 

Source: East Florida Banner: 2-4-1871








































Mr. Tilly Hickson was down from McIntosh Monday and says that the orange trees are putting on a vigorous growth and look very lovely with their verdure of green and fragrant blossoms. The vegetable growers are daily in receipt of pretty looking checks and their bank accounts are becoming quite respectable in appearance. In a word, the people of McIntosh are quite buoyant and their skies are brightened with a radiant rainbow of hope and promise and each one is expecting that fabled bag of gold. 

Source: Ocala Banner: 3-30-1906





















































Cane Grinding at the Marion Farm

Mr. Walter A. Taylor, manager of the Marion Farms, is making preparations for the cane grinding and syrup making business.

They will begin grinding about the fifteenth and will be very busy at this work  for at least a month. The Marion farms have about thirty acres in sugar cane of the finest varieties grown and they expect to make large quantities of syrup this year.

The Marions Farms almost entirely supply the various turpentine camps of the entire state with this necessary article of food, besides making an immense amount for the use of the convicts and employees of the farm. Source: Ocala Banner:12-21-1906











































Perry Edwards, our up-to-date colored farmer, who won so many premiums at the fair and so much notoriety, brought in two thousand pounds of pork yesterday to be placed in cold storage, and left the editor of this paper, a backbone of immense size and expects to feast high this Christmas. Friends are remembering him in all sorts of shapes. He has received presents of syrup, sweet potatoes, oranges and backbone and Governor Gilchrist is sending him a box of delicious pineapples. Is it not nice to be remembered by one’s friends! Source: Ocala Banner: 10-25-08




































William Martin, the pioneer the pioneer settler of Moss Bluff, was in town today. He came to get sage to make Martin Sausage. He said he had finished grinding cane and made twenty-five barrels of syrup, but his three boys were still at it and would make seventy barrels. That is some long sweetening for you. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 12-14-1909











































Mr. T. A. Langley, of Leroy, one of the thrifty farmers of Marion County, slaughtered last week, five pigs eighteen months old, that dressed net 1045 pounds. These animals had very little extra feed and demonstrates that razor-backs among the intelligent and progressive farmers are the exception and not the rule now-a-days. Source: Ocala Banner: 1-14-1889











































C. H. Dame had the first strawberries of the season yesterday. They were the finest ever seen here, many of them being as large as Peento Peaches. They sold rapidly at 40 cents a quart. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 2-7-1900







































The First Load

W. O. Parker, colored, of Ocala, brought the first wagon load of saw palmetto leaves to the Fiber Factory. The company wants 100,000 tons of the leaves and will pay the cash for them. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 6-7-1900







































We are informed that the son-in-law of the late Maj. Henning, at Summerfield, will plant fifty acres in cotton. This is a move in the right direction. If the waste lands in Marion county were put into cotton in 1901, it would grow the biggest money crop ever heard of here. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 1-9-1901







































Doings at Fort McCoy…Mr. J. J. Brinson, the bee king of this section reports that his bees are dying at a rapid rate. He having lost nearly sixty colonies already and they are still dying. He does not know the cause. There seems to be some kind of disease that destroys the whole swarm. Source: Ocala Banner: 5-7-1909









































A Ten Pound Rutabaga

Major L. T. Izlar placed on our table Friday fresh from his garden, a ten pound rutabaga turnip. It was solid to the core, sweet and delicious. Florida soil is certainly peculiarly and magnificently adapted to all kinds of root crops and is especially the home of the turnip. This vegetable seems to be one of the aborigines and was here when Ocala, the original indian chieftan was monarch of this section. Source: Ocala Banner: 3-2-1906












































Crops in Marion – The Banner of the 18th says:

The weather has been for the last week or so, unusually cool and pleasant; and the crops, both corn and cotton are flourishing. The cane is doing very well. The corn is wanting a little nourishing just now---something like rain. With this exception, everything in the line of crops are encouraging. The merchants are not so despondent this season as they were last year this time. Source: Weekly Floridian: 5-28-1872







































Mr. Tilly Hickson was down from McIntosh Monday and says that the orange trees are putting on a vigorous growth and look very lovely with their verdure of green and fragrant blossoms. The vegetable growers are daily in receipt of pretty looking checks and their bank accounts are becoming quite respectable in appearance. In a word the people of McIntosh are quite buoyant and their skies are brightened with radiant rainbow of hope and promise and each one is expecting that fabled bag of gold. Source: Ocala Banner: 3-30-1906









































C. J. Johnson, colored, who is farming on the Dr. Wilson place west of town, raised a fine crop of potatoes this season, one of which he brought to town the other day and it weighed twenty-two pounds. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 12-11-1908










































Col. L. P. Miller was in town this morning and said he had finished planting his oat crop and would soon begin on his 100 acre cassava patch. At present he is slaughtering his pork crop and has already brought into cold storage 35 porkers. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 1-15-1902







































William Martin, the pioneer settler of Moss Bluff, was in town today. He came to get sage to make Martin Sausage. He said he had finished grinding cane and made twenty-five barrels of syrup, but his three boys were still at it and would make seventy barrels. That is some long sweetening for you. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 12-14-1909




































McDuffy, the hustling colored farmer west of here, is shipping his twelfth car of melons today. He expects to have half a dozen more, but the crop was cut short nearly 50 per cent owing to the wet weather. Returns so far very satisfactory. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 6-26-1900







































Mr. A. E. Burnett’s pinery has passed successfully through the freeze and he feels quite happy over the result. He says so far he has sold 400 pines and has sixty fine ones now ripening for the market. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 1-7-1902










































Oranges

Captain DeLong of Candler, who saved his grove from the cold snap of last winter, has trees that have a hundred oranges on them. His grove is a beauty and a delight to the eyes. There are other fine orange groves in Candler. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 7-18-1900







































Genial Ben Freyermouth is in town today from his farm in the Blitchton section. Ben says he raised a splendid crop of corn and housed the last yesterday and now he will take a rest for a month. He will visit friends at Micanopy and then visit the Peace river country and inspect the pebble phosphate mines in Polk county. Mr. Freyermouth is certain the socialists are attempting to capture the colored vote in November and if possible land their ticket. Ben thinks the democrats better be getting busy. Source: Ocala Evening Star:8-26-1908








































Churchill…Miss Theresa Williamson has a fine garden now. I had the pleasure of taking dinner with her the other day. She had turnip greens, squash, okra, potatoes and tomatoes. In June she cut branches from the old tomato vines and set them out and now they are full of fruit and during these nice rains she is transplanting cabbage plants and if the editor will come over about Christmas she would likely give him cabbage for dinner. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 10-25-1900









































A. J. Albritton and his son Andrew, of Daisy, were in town this morning closing a trade with J. W. Gordon, for a tract of land in their section. This is the second tract they have bought within a short time, the other being a purchase from C. Priest. The Albrittons will use these lands for farming purposes, mostly for velvet beans, to feed stock. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 1-4-1902









































Will Pelot has temporarily given up the produce commission business in Jacksonville and is with his family in Ocala. He expects to go into the growing of melons, but has not yet picked out his field. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 1-20-1902








































Mr. Len Griggs, who occupies the Maj. Tom C. Hall farm on the Silver Springs hard road, is rejoicing over the fine shower, as he has forty acres in cantaloupes. The farmers have melons on the vines as large as a quart measure and the latter are matted all over. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 5-27-1908









































Mr. A. D. Mitchell of Summerfield was in the city yesterday. He reports that he and Mr. Joe Davis have 75 acres in oats, which are looking fine; that they will also put in 25 acres of melons and several acres of cantaloupes, with their usual corn and pindar crops and a whole field of tomatoes. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 2-10-1904









































Summerfield…A. H. Andrews, who resides on his farm southeast of here, is having much trouble with foraging cattle that broke down his fence and have destroyed ten acres of velvet beans. Mr. Andrews gives warning that he will pen up the cattle in future and will charge the owners with damage. Source: Source: Ocala Evening Star: 8-31-12







































Mr. W. F. Blesch returned this afternoon from a visit to his stock farm and peach orchard at Lady Lake. He said he thought from the state of the thermometer Monday night, the peach orchard was a goner, but they came out all right. The melon vines caught it however. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 4-5-1907







































Everyone who has seen his fields says Mr. H. H. Whitworth has at his Hiawatha Lake Stock Farm, two miles southwest of town, the most advanced tomatoes, Irish potatoes and cucumbers they have seen in the county. Many think the yield of potatoes and tomatoes, besides being the earliest will be the heaviest per acre, ever raised here. This is Mr. Whitworth’s first year planting these crops for market and the land used was intensely rich and has been well worked. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 5-5-1914







































Mr. Charles Howell with the big Howell and Chambliss farm, north of Ocala, shipped to Hastings last week to be put in cold storage, fifty-eight young hogs raised on the farm in the last two years. These porkers averaged 180 pounds apiece and are not all the farm will ship this year by any means. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 2-11-1914















































A Star reporter today saw a fine bunch of rice raised by Mr. Francis Kuhne near Burbank. It was as fine looking rice as one could wish to see, and he has three acres of it. There are thousands of acres of land in the Oklawaha  river valley that will grow as good rice as can be raised anywhere. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 11-15-1911






































George Easterling’s Farm

Mr. George W. Easterling’s big farm at Martell is looking well. He has in two hundres and twenty-five acres of melons and cantaloupes and they are doing as well as any in the county. The melon vines are running nicely and the ‘lope vines are great big plants, starting to run nicely. Mr. Easterling says the season is the best he has ever known and crops of all kinds are fully three weeks ahead of last season. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 4-5-1912


















































Will Pelot has temporarily given up the produce commission business in Jacksonville and is with his family in Ocala. He expects to go into the growing of melons, but has not yet picked out his field. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 1-20-1902










































Martel…Captain James Cribbitt, now actively engaged in orange culture at Largo, is on a visit at

Martel and looking after his plantation at York. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 10-23-1900







































Mr. Reed, the old veteran from Boardman was in town a few days ago and made the Star a

pleasant call. He said he had just finished packing Barton Keep’s crop of oranges, which the dry

weather had greatly reduced in quality and size. The coming week
Mr. Frank Sampson, who

owns the largest grove in that section, will begin gathering and shipping his crop, which with a

fair rainfall would have been 30,000 boxes, but owing to the drought the crop will only be

about half that amount. The ground is so dry that the leaves of the orange trees are badly

curled. Source: 11-27-1909









Marion County Wheat

Buford Leitner paid his old home a visit last July in South Carolina. He brought with him a 

half a peck of wheat, which he sowed last fall, probably covering a quarter acre of ground. 

The grain is now ready to cut, being of good stalk and well filled head and will yield about 

six bushels.

Buford is very proud of his crop and will thresh it and make Graham flour of it and be 

prouder than ever when his good wife presents to his guests delicious Graham wafers. Who 

says wheat wont groe in Marion county. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 5-24-1900







































Dr. Abshire, of Belleview, is a famous honey raiser. He sent up a lot yesterday which is exceedingly fine and almost transparent. He uses the new hives and the honey is made in little square frames, a pound in each. The honey is on sale at L. S. Black’s. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 9-1-1897















































Ocala’s Vegetable King

George Close, of Ocala, made a trip to his Montverde property this week and is much pleased with the looks of his orange trees. He is much encouraged and we think he will now go to work in earnest to rebuild his grove. Mr. Close is the vegetable king of Florida. While he has abandoned vegetable growing at Montverde, he is extensively engaged in it at Ocala. He is also a first class farmer; raises nearly everything that he needs. In fact, he lives at home and boards at the same place.—Leesburg Commercial Source: Ocala Evening Star: 11-26-1900










































George Close has dug and shipped 2000 barrels of Irish potatoes, and despite the fact that he will lose 40 percent, of his crop on account of the heavy rains, he has not dug half of the crop and will have over 4000 barrels. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 5-11-1900









































The finest field of corn seen on our trip to the Fairfield picnic, was that of David Payne, son of Marion L. Payne. It would show well in length of stalk and size of ear beside corn grown in the Mississippi bottom land, and when it comes to a slightly and thrifty orange grove, we have not seen its equal in Marion county. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 7-14-1898







































Anthony... The sweet potato crop will be short in this section. The velvet bean crop is not so good as last year, partly on account of caterpillars. Farmers say the weather is very dry, but not withstanding that they are reaching out for heavy crops. The corn crop being rather short, oats will be planted largely. Source: 11-22-1900








































A Mr. Bennett in the Shady neighborhood has an unusually fine crop of sugar cane. There are stalks on exhibition in Frank Ditto’s real estate office that count forty joints and they are the average. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 12-11-1908








































T. J. Barnes, one of Marion county’s  most successful farmers, brought in and presented to this office today, six of as fine, smooth and uniform sweet potatoes as we have ever seen. The six weighed just eighteen pounds. Sounds Ocala Evening Star: 2-10-1896






































Profitable Hens

J. F. Barrett of Santos, brother of our former citizen, Captain Barrett, during last year realized from thirty-five hens an income of $68. There are other good hen farmers in Marion county. Can they make as profitable a showing? It would be interesting to know Mr. Barrett’s treatment of his hens to make them so productive. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 1-10-1898










































Mr. W. J. Norsworthy, of McIntosh, has shipped one hundred and ninety boxes of grape fruit, for which he received the fine price of $7.50 per box. No wonder people are anxious that our citrus fruit trees shall again come into bearing. They seem to be more valuable than ever. Even with an occasional freeze they are more valuable then gold bearing bonds. Source: Ocala Banner: 11-8-1901






































J. A. Thomas, a farmer at Benedict, says that his corn crop this year will average at least seventy-five bushels to the acre. Mr. Thomas is a reliable citizen and what he says can be depended on. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 7-7-1896






































Fat Razor Backs

The Star takes pleasure in publishing the following report of the killing of fine, fat, razor back hogs. We hope other farmers will report the nature of their pork crops. These hogs were grown by Capt. Jno. H. Brooks of Cotton Plant, than whom there is not a clever or more honorable gentleman living in Marion County: “How is this for Florida razor backs. Six two year old hogs, the smallest of which weighed 225 pounds, and the largest 285 pounds, the average 250 pounds.  Twelve eight months old hogs netted 125 pounds each. All were fattened exclusively on pindars.”  Source: Ocala Evening Star: 1-5-1898









































Transcribed, Formatted and Submitted by Linda Flowers

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by  Linda Flowers  Updated: 3-26-2017
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